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podcastFREE AUDIO PODCASTS

Free podcasts from the Association's recent seminars are available from the links below. The files are in mp3 format and can be listened to through your web browser or downloaded for use on an iPod or other mp3 player.

• To listen to these files in your browser, download the Quicktime player.

• To download these files to your computer hard disk, control-click (windows) or right-click (mac) on links below and choose save option.

Videos of these seminars can be obtained from the Association at a cost of $25 in DVD format or $15 on a USB drive (incl GST and postage). Contact us at 0409 644 811 or info@keratoconus.asn.au.

Keratoconus Australia seminars

August 25, 2015
An update on corneal crosslinking by Dr Elsie Chan
This is an audio podcast of the full presentation

September 10, 2013
All about corneal crosslinking by Dr Elsie Chan (29 MB)
This is the full audio podcast from our recent seminar

August 28, 2012
How to manage itchy and dry eyes and contact lenses by A/Prof Mark Roth
(26 MB)


29 July 2008
New contact lenses - by Richard Lindsay, optometrist (24 MB)

A patient's view of corneal collagen crosslinking - Ainslie Fitzsimons (16 MB)

videoVIDEOS

Below are a list of videos of Demystifying Keratoconus information seminars. These are available for $25 each in DVD format. Prices include GST and postage. Special rates are available for multiple purchases. Email us for more information.

Payment can be made by electronic transfer/direct debit to
Keratoconus Australia Inc.
Westpac account details BSB: 033089 Account Number: 259107 (please email us to inform us of the payment and
say which video you would like).

Or just send a cheque or money order to
Keratoconus Australia Inc
PO Box 1109
Hawksburn VIC 3142
Australia

All about corneal collagen crosslinking

Allergies, Dry Eye and Contact Lenses

Contact lenses - a challenge for optometrist and patient

Corneal collagen crosslinking: the latest evidence and trends and a family's view

Keratoconus: research, new treatments and making the right choices

Corneal Collagen Crosslinking: how safe and effective is it?

New contact lenses and a patient's view of corneal collagen crosslinking

Corneal crosslinking, Intacs, Lamellar transplants and other new surgery for keratoconus: a review

A research update on the Corneal Collagen Crosslinking trial at the RVEEH and the results of the Keratoconus Inheritance Study

All about Corneal Collagen Crosslinking for keratoconus and the RVEEH trial

Keratoconus: from gene to graft (if necessary)

Advances in surgical and non-surgical options for keratoconus

Contact lenses and keratoconus: Good eye days, Bad eye days

Corneal transplant? get informed before giving consent

Living with Keratoconus: Stories and Lessons

Managing contact lenses for keratoconus

A Stitch in Time: a (personal) history of corneal transplantation

Intacs and Refractive Laser surgery: miracle cures or another false dawn?

Going Eye to Eye: Corneal donations and eye banking in Australia

Changing Perspectives: from health professional to emergency keratoconus patient

Why do contact lenses have to be so hard?

Beyond Diagnosis and A Parent's View

Recent developments in corneal surgery

All about corneal collagen crosslinking
10 September 2013

Speaker Dr Elsie Chan, researcher Centre for Eye Research Australia

Over the past decade, corneal collagen cross-linking has becomecommonplace as a treatment option for people diagnosed with progressive keratoconus.

Results have shown that cross-linking slows and may even halt the progression of keratoconus, with a small risk of complications.
More recently, variations to the cross-linking procedure have been performed.
In her talk, Dr Chan talk reviewed the theory, different treatment regimes and the clinical results of cross-linking.
She also presented an update of the results from the Melbourne trial and other upcoming research projects.

A DVD of the presentation is now available for those unable to attend.

This is the most complete and up-to-date review of crosslinking ever presented to a KA seminar.

Allergies, Dry Eye and Contact Lenses
Tuesday August 28, 2012

Speaker Associate Professor Mark Roth, senior Melbourne optometrist

Eye rubbing has been identified as a high risk factor in keratoconus and should be avoided as much as possible. However as many keratoconus patients also suffer from allergies which can cause severely itchy eyes, it is important that they ensure proper management of these allergies to prevent worsening their keratoconus and to facilitate contact lens wearing.

Current research also shows an increase in the prevalence of all types of allergic responses in the eye and dry eye continues to be a major impediment to contact lens wear. Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve management outcomes and early diagnosis and treatment of the signs and symptoms can help patients more comfortably wear their lenses.

rothIn this presentation A/Prof Roth reviewed the latest thinking on allergy and dry eye diagnosis, giving particular atention to the latest treatment optionsand how they are best used.

With the springtime allergy season in full swing, this is a must-see presentation for all keratoconus patients.

Associate Professor Mark Roth is a clinical optometrist with a degree in pharmacology. He is currently in private practice and is also a Principal Fellow in the Department of Optometry & Vision Sciences, the University of Melbourne. He has extensive experience as a therapeutic practitioner and a contact lens specialist. As an advocate for therapeutic progress in optometry, he contributes to various association, registration board and government committees. A/Prof Roth lectures widely at conferences in Australia and overseas and is involved in many optometry therapeutics and contact lens teaching programmes.

 

Contact lenses - a challenge for optometrist and patient
Tuesday June 5, 2012

Speaker Professor Jonathan Jackson, Head of Clinical Services at the Australian College of Optometry

Despite the recent focus on new surgical treatments, contact lenses remain the mainstay for people seeking a long term solution for vision loss caused by keratoconus. Contact lenses, notably rigid gas permeable lenses (RGPs), have evolved considerably over the past decade and can assist a far wider range of patients with keratoconus than ever before.

In his presentation, Professor Jackson explained what keratoconus is and the challenge it poses for both optometrist and patient. He reviewed the symptoms and signs associated with the condition and discussed the relative importance of a range of techniques used to both detect and quantify the severity of the condition.

Professor Jackson also examined the merits of providing various types of optical correction including both spectacles and contact lenses and the need for proper aftercare. Finally, he discussed his experience in Northern Ireland working with a variety of keratoconus patients.

The presentation was followed by a Q & A session.

Professor Jackson is a renowned optometrist from Ireland who until recently, was Head of Optometry at the Royal Victoria Hospital Belfast, Assistant Director of Integrated Care (Optometry) NI Health & Social Services Board and Policy Advisor (Optometry) at the Northern Ireland Department of Health & Social Services. He has been awarded Fellowship of the British Contact Lens Association (FBCLA, 2006) and the American Academy of Optometry (FAAOptom, 2008).

 

Corneal collagen crosslinking: the latest evidence and trends and a family's view
Tuesday 28 June 2011
Australian College of Optometry

Speakers Associate Professor Grant Snibson, Dr Christine Wittig-Silva

Corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) is the only treatment that provides hope of halting progressive keratoconus. Introduced into Australia in 2006, it is becoming the procedure of choice for most corneal surgeons and their keratoconus patients. Young adolescents, with often the most aggressive
form of keratoconus, are also being offered CXL today in increasing numbers.

What evidence is there to support this new treatment? Melbourne’s world-leading randomized control trial of CXL is now into its fifth year and the results remain positive. The trial recently released data indicating that after four years, keratoconus patients receiving CXL remain stable or are even improving slightly and are showing no side effects. Corneal surgeons around Australia and overseas are watching this trial closely to see if patients continue to enjoy long term benefit from this treatment.

Associate Professor Grant Snibson and Dr Christine Wittig-Silva, principal investigators on the crosslinking trial presented their most recent results and discussed trends in crosslinking here and in other countries. These include efforts to reduce treatment times and modify the procedure to achieve better results in a wider range of patients.

Ben Johnson, now 22, was 18 years of age when he entered the CXL trial. Ben and his mum Georgie Munro, spoke about their experiences in deciding to have crosslinking done and the effect on their iives.
All speakers answered questions from the audience.

This is a must-see seminar for anyone considering corneal collagen crosslinking for themselves or their children.

A DVD of the seminar is now available for those who were unable to attend ($25 incl. GST and postage). A free podcast of proceedings will also be made available later.

Keratoconus: research, new treatments and making the right choices

Keynote Speaker - Prof Doug Coster, Flinders University
September 1, 2010

Professor Coster examined different aspects of keratoconus including current and future research, corneal collagen crosslinking and other new treatments. He also discussed evidence-based medecine and how patients can assess the suitability of these treatments and when to have them.

A lively debate followed the presentation with a variety of views being presented by patients and eye-carers about corneal collagen crosslinking and the risks of the treatment in the absence of any long term or large scale clinical studies regarding its safety and effectiveness

Prof Doug Coster is an internationally-recognized expert in keratoconus research and treatments with over 35 years experience in Australia and overseas. He currently holds a range of distinguished positions including Lions Professor of Ophthalmology at Flinders University (SA), Senior Director of Ophthalmology, Flinders Medical Centre, is editorial board member of several international ophthalmology publications and serves on a number of government advisory committees.

Prof Coster also created the Australian Corneal Graft Registry which tracks the outcomes of some 15,000 corneal transplants Australia-wide. Highly-decorated author of over 170 papers on keratoconus, gene therapy and corneal disease, he has a profound insight into the risk factors for keratoconus and best-practice management of this condition.

 

blockCorneal Collagen Crosslinking: how safe and effective is it?

Associate Professor Grant Snibson and Dr Christine Wittig

Joanne Brooks - A patients story

 

Corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) is a new treatment that provides the unprecedented hope that progression in keratoconus can be slowed or halted. Although still experimental, the treatment is now being offered by corneal surgeons to keratoconus patients around Australia. But is it safe and really effective? And if so, who can benefit from this procedure?

The world's first randomized clinical trial of CXL began in Melbourne at the Centre for Eye Research Australia (CERA) in 2006 and has since been extended to Brisbane. Early results were promising. Now, after three years, some of the answers to these questions are emerging.

Associate Professor Grant Snibson and Dr Christine Wittig, principal investigators on the CXL trial at CERA, presented the most recent results from the trial and explained what these mean for patients considering this treatment. They also discussed plans for future research which will hopefully extend the pool of keratoconus patients which may be able to benefit from CXL.

Both speakers answered many questions from attendees about their research and the implications of this work for the development of treatments for keratoconus in the future.

Joanne Brooks, Australia's first trial participant, provided a colorful account of her personal experience leading up to and since the treatment.

This is a must-see video for anyone considering corneal collagen crosslinking for themselves or their children.

blockNew contact lenses for keratoconus

Richard Lindsay, Melbourne optometrist & contact lens fitter

 

A patient’s story about corneal collagen crosslinking

Ainslie Fitzsimons, participant in the RVEEH 3C-R trial


29 July 2008

 

 

New contact lenses for keratoconus

When diagnosed with keratoconus, you would like to think there is a quick fix for the condition and associated vision loss. Surgery immediately comes to mind. But for most patients, the most effective solution is a lot less drastic and has a more predictable outcome. Initially, it will be spectacles. If the condition progresses, it will be contact lenses.  

 

Contact lenses - usually rigid gas permeable - are unquestionably the best, long-term solution for vision loss caused by keratoconus. When correctly fitted, they can offer long wearing times, relatively easy maintenance and most importantly, excellent vision. Over the past decade, contact lenses for keratoconus have evolved dramatically and today there is a wide range of options for keratoconic corneas, which would have required a corneal transplant in the past.   Many patients (and optometrists too!) are unaware of the progress made in the area of contact lenses for keratoconus, while others believe that wearing contact lenses will just be too hard.

Richard Lindsay, a Melbourne optometrist specializing in contact lenses for keratoconus, dispelled some of these misconceptions. He explained why contact lenses are so effective in managing this condition and why they should be explored fully before considering surgical options, such as intacs and corneal transplants.   Richard also described the latest developments in contact lenses for keratoconus, including soft lenses, different rigid lens designs (small lenses, large diameter lenses, decentred optic zones, mini-sclerals), hybrid lenses (SynergEyes and SoftPerm) and piggyback systems (rigid on soft).  

 

A Patient’s Story

Corneal collagen crosslinking (3C-R) is a new surgical procedure designed to strengthen the cornea and stop progression in keratoconus. The world's largest clinical trial of 3C-R is taking place at Melbourne's Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital.   Ainslie Fitzsimons, is a member of Keratoconus Australia and nurse by profession, had both eyes crosslinked as part of the Melbourne trial. She discussed her experience during the procedure and recovery period for others considering this new but still experimental surgery.    

 

blockNew surgery for Keratoconus: a review of corneal collagen crosslinking, deep lamellar transplants and intacs
November 21, 2007

In the past, surgery was considered a last-resort option for keratoconus. Today, patients at different stages of keratoconus are being offered a range of options, some still experimental.

Amongst these are corneal collagen crosslinking, Intacs and lamellar corneal transplantation, all of which are now becoming available in Australia.

Dr Michael Loughnan and Dr Terry Ong discussed the latest surgical developments for keratoconus, who can benefit from them, when they should be considered by patients. Particular emphasis was given to their risks and limitations.

The presentation also included an overview of keratoconus, which will be of particular interest to newly diagnosed patients seeking more information about their condition and its management.

Dr Loughnan and Dr Ong are Melbourne corneal surgeons with many years of experience in the field of keratoconus in Australia and overseas. Both work at the corneal clinic of Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital in Melbourne and in private practice.

blockA Keratoconus Research Update
May 16, 2007

  • Corneal collagen crosslinking trial - one year on
  • The keratoconus inheritance study - outcomes and implications

Trials of the corneal collagen crosslinking (3C-R) treatment for keratoconus are well underway around Australia.

Dr Christine Wittig, Research Fellow at the Centre for Eye Research Australia, presented an update on the Melbourne 3C-R trial which began almost 12 months ago. The trial is currently following 38 treated eyes and early results are positive. She also provided information about the Brisbane trial which recently started. Dr Wittig explained recent changes in the trial protocol, which should open the trial to more potential patients.

Dr Tim Steele, research fellow at the Melbourne Excimer Laser Group, presented a further update on the outcomes of the genetics study of families with keratoconus conducted in Melbourne.

Both speakers answered questions about their research and the implications of this work for the development of treatments for keratoconus in the future.

blockAll about Corneal Collagen Crosslinking for keratoconus and the RVEEH trial
May 30, 2006


Speakers Dr Christine Wittig
Dresden University and CERA trial researcher
Dr Grant Snibson
RVEEH Corneal Unit and trial leader

A new treatment based on corneal collagen crosslinking developed at the Dresden University in Germany has had success in slowing and even halting the progression of keratoconus. Dr Snibson and Dr Wittig, who participated in the Dresden trials, are about to start a larger study at Melbourne's Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital. The study aims to prove the treatment's effectiveness in the hope that it could become widely available in Australia in the near future.

This seminar provided patients with a unique opportunity to hear about the treatment and the trial, and to question the study convenors about its implications for all of us with keratoconus.

It was the Association's biggest-ever event, attended by over 110 persons.

block Keratoconus: from gene to graft (if necessary)
October 25, 2005

Speakers
Pr Doug Coster,
ophthalmologist and corneal surgeon

In his presentation, Prof Coster attempted to clarify the reasons for the increase in frequency of keratoconus, looked at the genetics of the condition, and reviewed the available treatments. Someinterventions are well established and are proven to be effective - others are more developmental. He outlined a decision tree for the treatment of keratoconus based on the scientific evidence that is available.

Prof Doug Coster is an internationally-recognized expert in keratoconus research and treatments with over 30 years experience in Australia and overseas. He currently holds a range of distinguished positions including Lions Professor of Ophthalmology at Flinders University (SA), Senior Director of Ophthalmology, Flinders Medical Centre, is editorial board member of several international ophthalmology publications and serves on a number of government advisory committees. Prof Coster also created the Australian Corneal Graft Registry which tracks the outcomes of some 14,000 corneal transplants Australia-wide. Highly-decorated author of over 170 papers on keratoconus, gene therapy and corneal disease, he has a profound insight into the risk factors for keratoconus and best-practice management of this condition.

Dr Tim Steele
Update on genetics study of families with keratoconus

block Advances in surgical and non-surgical options for keratoconus
Tuesday October 11, 2005

Speakers

Dr Anthony Maloof, MBBS (Hons), MBiomedE, FRANZCO, FRACS ophthalmologist and corneal surgeon

This interactive presentation covered newer approaches to surgical intervention for keratoconus. Specifically, Deep Lamellar Keratoplasty to eliminate endothelial rejection after transplantation, which is the most common cause of transplant failure. Indications for surgical management were discussed. A brief overview of the principles of surgical correction of the cornea for Keratoconus were also presented.

Jim Kokkinakis, BOptom FAAO ISCLS
clinical optometrist

Mr Kokkinakis discussed the latest advances in non-surgical options for keratoconus patients.

A video of the seminar is now available.

blockContact lenses and keratoconus:
Good eye days, Bad eye days
May 4, 2005


Presented by Mark Roth, clinical optometrist

Rigid contact lenses are the primary means for restoring best vision to most people with keratoconus. Yet despite being fitted with the best lenses possible and adhering to good compliance practices, many contact lens wearers with keratoconus complain of periodic contact lens discomfort or intolerance.

Speaking at our May 4 seminar in Melbourne, Mark Roth, clinical optometrist, reviewed some of the reasons why patients have "bad eye days" including common complaints related to dry eyes, allergies and general eye redness. Mr Roth provided a detailed analysis of the causes of these conditions. He then outlined a range of options for their management and ways of improving the ocular surface.

Mr Roth also discussed some of new contact lens cleaning agents which can greatly facilitate lens care and comfort.The seminar was attended by 65 members, their families and optometrists who took advantage of the opportunity to ask numerous questions about eye and contact lens care. Seminar photos can be found here.

If you wear contact lenses and you weren’t able to join us, you should watch this video. Place your order now.

Mark Roth is a Melbourne-based clinical optometrist in private practice. He also has a degree in pharmacology. Mark works in a specialist contact lens practice in the areas of keratoconus, continuous wear lenses, paediatric contact lenses, orthokeratology and therapeutic management of the problematic contact lens wearer.

Corneal transplant? get informed before giving consent
November 10, 2004

Speakers
Dr Alexander Poon,
Melbourne corneal surgeon
Pam Mayne, double transplant recipient

Dr Poon provided a detailed explanation of the stages of keratoconus and the latest non-surgical and surgical options for patients at each stage. His description of the surgical options, including partial (deep lamellar) and full thickness corneal transplants, will answer most questions in the mind of those facing the prospect of a corneal transplant in the near future - or anyone interested in these procedures.

Pam Mayne described her own corneal transplant experiences, how she decided to embark upon that course and what happened during and after the operations.

This video gives a comprehensive overview of keratoconus and its treatments and should be seen by everybody who has keratoconus.

Living with keratoconus: Stories and Lessons
August 24, 2004

Speakers
Richard Vojlay, optometrist - The stages of keratoconus
Veronica Cerritelli - Switching to contact lenses
Dr Michael Loughnan, corneal surgeon - New developments in surgery
Angelo Capuano - Taking the initiative

Speakers at the August open forum discussed a range of topics concerning keratoconus and its management from both an eye-carer and patient point of view.

This video provides a guide to patients about what to expect as their keratoconus evolves, managing the switch from glasses to contact lenses, the latest developments in the artificial cornea and intacs and finally strategies for taking control of your keratoconus.

Managing contact lenses for keratoconus
October 23, 2003

Speaker Mr Russell Lowe, Melbourne optometrist

Mr Lowe gave a detailed explanation of how contact lenses assist in restoring vision to keratoconus patients. He also discussed new developments in contact lens technology and presented practical advice to assist patients in managing contact lens wear for the best long term results.

A must-see video for anybody interested in learning more about creating a long-term sustainable system for caring for their contact lenses... and their eyes.

A Stitch in Time: a (personal) history of corneal transplantation
June 25, 2003

Speaker Dr Dick Galbraith, corneal surgeon

Major advances in keratoconus treatments over the past generation have sharply reduced the impact, although not the incidence, of this potentially-serious eye disease. Corneal transplants are today the most successful of all organ transplants, while advanced contact lens materials have improved the prognosis for most keratoconus patients. But it wasn't always so. Prior to the development of reliable corneal transplantation techniques, even moderate keratoconus could result in severe visual impairment.

So what was it like then and how have things changed? What does a diagnosis of keratoconus really mean for a patient today and how should a patient deal with eye-carers? What should keratoconus patients expect in the future?

Dr J.E.K. "Dick" Galbraith is one of the country's most experienced corneal surgeons and was a pioneer in the introduction and development of modern transplantation techniques in Australia. During a distinguished career spanning 32 years including 22 years as head of the eye unit at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, he performed over 1000 corneal transplants and published innumerable papers on the subject. Dr Galbraith has also done extensive eye care work and training with local and regional indigenous groups and remains active in that field. As such, he is uniquely qualified to discuss just about every aspect of keratoconus and its management.

At our June 25 seminar, Dr Galbraith traced the evolution of keratoconus treatments and corneal transplantation in Australia and provided a swag of fascinating and often hilarious stories about the history of corneal surgery. A must-see video

Email us if you would like to buy this video.

Intacs and Refractive Laser surgery: miracle cures or another false dawn?
April 2, 2003

Dr Laurence Sullivan, Melbourne cornea, cataract and refractive surgeon

In the search for that ever-elusive cure for keratoconus, international research is focusing on intacs as a simple, surgical means of slowing if not halting advancing corneal warpage. But what are they, do they work and is the procedure being performed in Australia? Is laser surgery appropriate for keratoconus patients and if so, under what circumstances?

Melbourne cornea, cataract and refractive surgeon, Dr Laurence Sullivan discussed these techniques and provided answers to many of the questions surrounding their use in the treatment of keratoconus.

Going Eye to Eye:
Corneal donations and eye banking in Australia

October 23, 2002

Dr Graeme Pollock and Dr Grant Snibson

Most people with keratoconus will hopefully never require a corneal transplant. But the unpredictable nature of keratoconus means that we all think about it at some stage of our lives.

So where does the cornea used to replace your own keratoconic one actually come from? How is it selected? Where is it stored? For how long? How is it screened for diseases? How is it matched with your eye? Why are waiting lists for corneal transplants so long? Who has priority for corneal tissue when it becomes available? What happens if a cornea is not available on the scheduled day of the operation? What is the lifespan of a transplanted cornea? Can artificial corneas be used instead of human corneas? When will stem cell research make it possible for us to grow our own replacement corneas? How can friends and family assist with organ donation?

Dr Graeme Pollock and Dr Grant Snibson answered these questions in a fascinating presentation to the Association's members at our October 23, 2002 seminar.

Matt Vaughan, committee member of Keratoconus Australia Inc, discussed progress in his inquiry into the health rebate system for keratoconus patients and how it could be improved. (see Events)

Order the video now

Changing Perspectives:
from health professional to emergency keratoconus patient
June 19, 2002

Judith Glazner, psychologist and nurse

Judith Glazner is a psychologist and nurse at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne. For the past 10 years she has worked with young people with cystic fibrosis (a life limiting chronic illness) and their families. About 2 years ago Judith was diagnosed with keratoconus and experienced a rapid deterioration in her vision. She also suffered a spontaneous corneal perforation. After an operation to attempt to “glue” the hole, she was then given a tissue patch graft using a donor cornea.

Ms Glazner gave a moving account of how she coped with the sudden switch in roles from health professional to a patient with an incurable, degenerative eye disease facing serious vision loss. Despite her training as a psychologist and experience in providing health care support for others, her adjustment to the diagnosis of keratoconus and the subsequent need for corneal surgery proved a painful transition.

Ms Glazner was able to draw on her experience as a health professional to provide guidance and coping strategies for others diagnosed with keratoconus, and facing the psychological challenges of living with all that accompanies this little-known eye disease.

Larry Kornhauser, president of Keratoconus Australia Inc, discussed support and referral work being carried out by the Association and provided some tips for people finding difficulty in negotiating the health system.

Order the video now

Why do contact lenses have to be so hard?
August 2001 in Melbourne

Richard Lindsay, optometrist

A panel of expert practitioners and users discussed the many aspects of contact lenses fitting and long term wearing.

Richard Lindsay
is an optometrist practising in Melbourne. He specialises in fitting glasses and contact lenses to patients with keratoconus and has also done research in the field. Mr Lindsay described how contact lenses are used in managing keratoconus and the latest developments in contact lenses technology. His presentation was followed by a panel discussion about the issues facing long term users of contact lenses and question time.

Beyond Diagnosis and A Parent's View
March 2001 in Melbourne

Dr Don Collie, ophthalmologist

Dr Collie outlined the development of keratoconus, reasons for corneal surgery, use of local vs general anesthetics in corneal grafting, possible complications and after-care. He answered many detailed questions about grafts and their role in restoring vision. He also discussed keratoconus and genetics and the role of laser eye surgery in keratoconus.

Ms Elena Rullo, former treasurer of Keratoconus Australia, discussed her experiences as a parent of an adolescent who required a corneal graft.

We highly recommend this video to anybody recently diagnosed with keratoconus and facing the prospect of a corneal graft in the near future, and parents of young children diagnosed with keratoconus.

Recent developments in corneal surgery
6 June 2000

Dr Michael Loughnan, ophthalmologist

The first seminar in the Demystifying Keratoconus Series was held at the Victorian College of Optometry in June 2000. The keynote speaker at the seminar was corneal surgeon Dr Michael Loughnan who outlined the latest developments in keratoconus surgery. Dr Loughnan also answered questions on a range of issues relating to keratoconus and its management.